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Announcements

Free Speech, Free Minds, Free Markets

13.05.2018
The Department of the History of Philosophy and the Polish Philosophy Society - Section in Kraków will host a lecture by Professor Tara Smith (University of Texas at Austin), titled "Free Speech, Free Minds, Free Markets".
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Events in the Philosophy of Language and Mind

16.05.2018
Section of Logical Rhetoric and the Jagiellonian Centre for Law, Language, and Philosophy would like to invite everyone interested in the topic to participate in a series of lectures in the philosophy of language and mind, as well as to workshops in the philosophy of language.

Cracow 3rd Series of Lectures in the Philosophy of Language: Francois Recanati (Institut Jean Nicod, Paris)

21 May 2018, 2:30 p.m., Room 25 - Speech Acts
22 May 2018, 2:30 p.m., Room 25 - Direct Reference
23 May 2018, 2:30 p.m., Room 25 - Contextualism and Compositionality

Workshop "Context and Content: From Language to Thought", 24 May 2018
invited speakers: Francois Recanati (Institut Jean Nicod, Paris), Joanna Odrowąż-Sypniewska (Warsaw University), Michael Murez (Université de Nantes)

Cracow 4th Series of Lectures in the Philosophy of Language: Michael Murez (Université de Nantes)

29 May 2018, 2:30 p.m., Room 28 - Michael Murez: Mental Files: An Introduction
29 May 2018, 7:00 o.m., Room 28 - Michael Murez: Mental Files: Challenges and New Directions

If you would like to participate in the events, please contact Prof. Katarzyna Kijania-Placek at: katarzyna.kijania-placek@uj.edu.pl.
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Roman Ingarden Lectures

14.05.2018
The Department of Ontology and The Research Centre of Roman Ingarden will host a lecture by Professor Amie Thomasson (Dartmouth College, USA) on "Easy Ontology and the Work of Metaphysics". Prof. Thomasson specializes in metaphysics, philosophy of mind, phenomenology and philosophy of art.

Abstract: In the era after Quine, mainstream metaphysics has been dominated by questions about whether things of various sorts (numbers, persons, properties, artifacts…) exist. Such questions have generally been pursued with a neo-Quinean quasi-scientific methodology that seeks the best ‘total theory’. But such a conception of what we are doing in pursuing existence questions has led to serious problems, including an apparent rivalry with the natural sciences, a lack of convergence that leads to a despairing skepticism, and epistemological mysteries about how we could come to know the answers to ontological questions. In Ontology Made Easy I argued that we should reject the neo-Quinean approach to existence questions, allowing instead that many ontological questions can be answered by trivial arguments from uncontested premises. Some critics, however, have thought that makes ontology too easy—with little of interest remaining for metaphysics to do. Here I address that worry, arguing that, even if we accept the easy approach to ontology, we can reconceive of the work of metaphysics as determining what concepts we should use, and how we should use them. This view, I argue, preserves our sense that metaphysics is important, and difficult, and worth doing—and that it has worldly relevance. At the same time, however, it preserves deflationism’s advantages in avoiding the problems notoriously faced by mainstream metaphysics.
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Section of Logical Rhetoric

16.05.2018
Szymon Szymczak, MA, will deliver a talk: "On types of implication obtained through residuation property".
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Lectures by Prof. Stephen Mumford (Durham University)

16.05.2018
Invitation to two lectures by Stephen Mumford, professor of metaphysics at Durham University: 1. "Introducing the Dispositional Modality", Monday, 20 November, 6:00 p.m. 2. "Are There Negative Kinds?", Tuesday, 21 November, 12:00 a.m.
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